I have had my question put on hold/blocked because I was asking about a specific cryptanalysis example, which would detract from the general usefulness of the question to others, even though I was simply asking for general advice on how to proceed with the cryptanalysis.

Quoting the question:

Compression function cryptanalysis

A compression function converts a fixed-sized input into a smaller fixed size output. Suppose one had a large collection of input-output pairs, hundreds of examples of collisions, and even some triple collisions. What is the standard way this would be cryptanalyzed?

If this is not the place to ask specific questions about cryptography, where is better?

migrated from crypto.stackexchange.com Jun 14 at 2:24

This question came from our site for software developers, mathematicians and others interested in cryptography.

This appears to be a duplicate of this meta question.

The accepted answer is to ask in The Side Channel, the chat for crypto.stackexchange.

  • 2
    I can't participate in the side channel because I don't have enough reputation points. – user59513 Jun 14 at 10:58
  • I changed the question completely to something very general. Can it get reopened, or is it forever closed and I do it in a new question? – user59513 Jun 14 at 11:06
  • @user59513 Not having sufficient rep is a good counter point - you're not in a very fair position. I asked a question about what can be done for people in your situation. As for your question, I don't think it is in the current state. But perhaps I can help you edit it to something that won't be voted to be closed again if it is re-opened. – Ella Rose Jun 14 at 15:35
  • That would be very helpful, thank you. What could I edit so that it can be reopened? – user59513 Jun 14 at 15:37
  • @user59513 I made some edits to it for you; Please ensure that I did not change the meaning of your question. – Ella Rose Jun 14 at 15:40
  • Thank you very much. It looks great, and the meaning is the same. Hopefully it can be reopened again. – user59513 Jun 14 at 15:44

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